Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Sound off to NCDOT about biking, walking,

If you have thoughts - and I bet you do - about what the North Carolina Department of Transportation could do better to help bicyclists and pedestrians, here's a chance to give them your opinions.

Take a Bike-Ped survey for NCDOT. It's quick, and who knows, they may actually use it. Even if they don't, it might feel better to get stuff off your chest. Survey link sent courtesy of Dick Winters, the Safe Routes to Schools coordinator for Mecklenburg County Public Health.

16 comments:

Michael King said...

Thanks for the link. Maybe one day we'll stop hearing about pedestrians and cyclists being killed on major roads like Indep. Blvd.

stanky said...

Pedestrians and cyclists shouldn't be on Independence Blvd.

Mark said...

Thanks for Posting. It might be worth noting that I had trouble accessing the survey using the latest beta version of Chrome, but was able to do so with IE

Anonymous said...

stanky +1

I filled out the survey. Not sure what planet these people are from, but on THIS planet North Carolina is staring at a $3 billion budget deficit, yet they want to spend spend spend on feel-good make-work projects that < 2% of the population would use.

Michael King said...

Stanky,
What do you proposed we do with the the thousands of people who live within a quarter mile of Independence? I guess I just imagine all of the apartment complexes, grocery stores, and retail along Independence Blvd?

You know, the ones who actually live and pay taxes within our county, instead of using the road as a highway to subsidize their tax fleeing, unsustainable houses in the exburbs.

David said...

Michael,
What Charlotte doe not need is more bicyclists who ignore stop signs, lights, pass on right, blow through intersections, block lanes, etc. Yes many do obey the laws, but many do not- and yes many of those are the "hard-core" with the cycling jerseys, etc.
I'm tired of the cyclists whining about motorists not respecting their rights when so many cyclists routinely thumb their noses at the laws and put themselves in danger.

Anonymous said...

Michael King....I 100% agree. Along with thousands of others I live within a quarter mile of the John Belk Freeway W (I-277) which you obviously know splits off towards the east to become Independence Blvd.

My quickest access to Independence is I-277...we need to work together so that along with Independence Blvd we ALSO get I-277 bicycle friendly!

You have no idea how many close calls I've had while riding my mountain bike on the John Belk Freeway!

Anonymous said...

Road improvements are supposed to be paid through taxes collected on fuel sales Michael. It would appear the ones fleeing taxes are the ones who don't buy the fuel, but expect the benefit from those that do.

Rodger Lentz said...

Dear Anonymous who said:

"I filled out the survey. Not sure what planet these people are from, but on THIS planet North Carolina is staring at a $3 billion budget deficit, yet they want to spend spend spend on feel-good make-work projects that < 2% of the population would use."

Experts agree we are headed for $5 per gallon gas (these are oil company execs, not environmentalists). If we keep doing things the way we have done for generations then we will get the same result. We simply are going to need to change the way we develop and we are going to have to get on our feet or bikes when possible. In fact, fewer kids and young adults are driving today, just one quote from a story on the topic:

"But Zipcar did commission a poll, and it finds that half of all 18- to 34 year-olds are spending less time behind the wheel. But they go further than that — they say they’d spend even less time driving if they had alternative ways of getting around."

This is important - Gen. Y, who they are talking about above, represents 80 million people. The baby boomers who are hitting 65 this year, are around 75 million. Baby Boomers wanted cars, cul-de-sacs, and a half acre. Gen. Y could care less about that. Do some reading on that generation's preferences. Gen. Y chooses where to live not based on jobs first, but on quality of life and location. They are looking for a place that matches their desired lifestyle. The best states, the best cities, the best towns will embrace this fact and make decisions to attract Gen. Y. Creating a walking and biking friendly place is simply a prerequisite to attracting this generation who will be the ones holding the wealth as the Baby Boomers pass on over the next 20 years.

Anonymous said...

The survey has a strong bias toward making cyclists "second class" and not allowed on the roads. Cyclists should be treated just like drivers and use the same travel lanes.

Michael said...

I want a horse lane.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

"....Cyclists should be treated just like drivers and use the same travel lanes."

Ok...well I do not recall hearing drivers complaining in the media every time there is a fender bender. I was driving my Ford Expedition the other day and some idiot ran into the back of me...I didn't complain to the media that that vehicle was not giving me enough space.

If you want to be "treated just like drivers" then you will have to also accept the fact that accidents happen. And it does not take a rocket surgeon or a brain scientist to figure out a 200lb bicycle/human combo will lose to a 2 ton vehicle every single time.

If you feel that way and apparently you do then you will have to take the same chance as the rest of us when you hit the road. The only difference is when an accident does happen you need to realize that the physics of the situation are not in your favor.

Anonymous said...

This is what we need here:

http://dailycaller.com/2011/01/12/training-wheels-to-license-plates-new-jersey-may-soon-require-teens-and-adults-to-register-bikes-or-face-fines/

Anonymous said...

As a cyclist, I accept that accidents happen. I don't accept being deliberately run over by drivers. Nor do I accept being pushed off the road.

Anonymous said...

Also, bicycles damage and wear the road far, far less than cars. So if you want to help overcome the 3 billion deficit, you can reduce the road costs by riding a bicycle instead of driving.

J said...

stanky,

I gather by the tone of your posts that you are one of the many drivers around here that think that getting behind the wheel of a motor vehicle makes you a superior life form to anyone who is not behind the wheel of a motor vehicle. I come within a couple feet of getting run over by at least one of these types every single day. Pedestrians are not bugs that God has ordained you to exterminate; we are human beings just like you.

Mary, thanks for the survey link. I hope someoe really does read and use the results.